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Bringing container magic to cloud-native applications 

Last year at Microsoft Connect and DockerCon we announced the Cloud Native Application Bundle (CNAB) specification in partnership with Docker, HashiCorp, and Bitnami. Since then the CNAB community has grown to include Pivotal, Intel, Datadog, and others, and we are all extremely pleased to announce that the CNAB core 1.0 specification has reached Final Draft...

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DevSecOps in Kubernetes 

Traditional security processes can often become a roadblock when delivering software via DevOps processes at the rate that today’s business world demands. Today, security is not just the responsibility of the security teams—it is a shared responsibility among all the teams in the applications lifecycle. This integration is known as DevSecOps. DevSecOps is not about...

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Join us for the first Windows Containers in Kubernetes “Unconference” 

Since Windows containers became a stable feature in Kubernetes earlier this year, we’ve seen exciting growth in use of Windows container technology. The fact that most cloud providers now have managed services supporting Windows containers through the Kubernetes API is a reflection of the demand.  During conversations among the community at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon in Barcelona a few months ago, it became apparent that there needs to be more effort...

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Demystifying containers, Docker, and Kubernetes 

Modern application infrastructure is being transformed by containers. The question is: How do you get started? Understanding what problems containers, Docker, and Kubernetes solve is essential if you want to build modern cloud-native apps or if you want to modernize your existing legacy applications. In this post, we’ll go through what they are and how...

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Kubernetes: What it is and what it isn’t 

I’m a developer and I’ll admit it, I’m learning Kubernetes. I’ve been developing web applications now for more than 20 years; however, the past two years I’ve moved to working with microservices applications. Originally the microservices were web sites on multiple virtual machines. Last year we started moving towards containers to achieve a higher density...

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Hello Service Mesh Interface (SMI): A specification for service mesh interoperability 

Today we are excited to launch Service Mesh Interface (SMI) which defines a set of common, portable APIs that provide developers with interoperability across different service mesh technologies including Istio, Linkerd, and Consul Connect. SMI is an open project started in partnership with Microsoft, Linkerd, HashiCorp, Solo.io, Kinvolk, and Weaveworks; with support from Aspen Mesh,...

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Helm 3: simpler to use, more secure to operate 

Helm is the best way to find, share, and use software built for Kubernetes, and the eagerly anticipated Helm 3 alpha is now available for testing. Try it out, give feedback, and help the Helm community get it ready for you to depend upon. Why Helm? Many teams already rely on Helm 2 to deploy...

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Extending Kubernetes in the open 

Greetings and welcome to KubeCon EU in Barcelona! As always, it is wonderful to see the community come together to celebrate how Kubernetes has made cloud-native ubiquitous and changed the way that we build and manage our software. These conferences are fantastic because they represent an opportunity to meet with our users and learn about...

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Pre-KubeCon EU workshops on Kubernetes dev tooling 

The Upstream Azure Container Compute Team is headed to Barcelona in a few weeks for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2019! Join us the day before the conference starts for FREE open source dev tooling workshops at the Hotel Porta Fira (right by the conference venue) on Monday, May 20th. Get hands-on learning on our open...

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Announcing KEDA: bringing event-driven containers and functions to Kubernetes 

Event-driven architectures are a natural evolution of microservices, enabling a flexible and decoupled design, and are increasingly being adopted by enterprise customers. Fully managed serverless offerings like Azure Functions are event–driven by design, but we have been hearing from customers about gaps in these capabilities for solutions based on Kubernetes. Scaling in Kubernetes is reactive, based on the CPU and memory consumption of a container. In contrast, services like Azure Functions are acutely...

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